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“Ya” Is Way Less Confusing Than You Think – Spanish Pro Tip

“Ya” Is Way Less Confusing Than You Think – Spanish Pro Tip

The reason why you often see more ya’s in a Spanish dialogue than tears in a hot sauce convention is that ya is an incredibly expressive word.

In most classrooms, it is usually translated as already; but out there in the wild, it has a bunch of other interesting meanings:

—¡No, por favor! Esa peli ya la vi en el cine y todavía estoy esperando a que me devuelvan esas dos horas de mi vida.
“No, please. That movie, I already saw it in the (movie theatre) and I am still waiting (so that) they give me back those two hours of my life.”

Ya verás como la segunda vez te gusta más.
(At some future time) you will see how the second time (you watch it) it pleases you more.”

—Mira, la semana pasada me recomendaste Transformers y casi me suicido, así que ya no cuela.
“Look, (the) last week you recommended Transformers (to me) and I almost (suicide / kill) myself, so (it doesn’t go through the strainer / I don’t believe you) now

Already, at some future time, now. What’s the deal?

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The Secret to Getting Natives to Speak Spanish with You

The Secret to Getting Natives to Speak Spanish with You

Has this ever happened to you?

Liz.—Buenas tardes. ¿Puedo ordenar dos tacos de carnitas, por favor?

“Taco vendor: Here you go. Anything to drink?”

Liz.—No, gracias ಠ_ಠ.

It can be pretty discouraging to speak to someone in your best Spanish and get a response in English. You might even begin to doubt your ability to learn foreign languages or assume that your level of Spanish isn’t good enough for a conversation.

The truth is that how much Spanish you know is not the only factor that determines whether you get an English or a Spanish response—you also have to consider the type of native that you’re talking to.

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Flirting in Spanish like a Pro

Flirting in Spanish like a Pro

One of the benefits you unlock when you start studying Spanish is the privilege of flirting with the natives. If you haven’t done a lot of Spanish flirting so far, now is your chance to get started.

If you’re in a happy relationship and have no interest in flirting, I’ll just tell you now that this whole post is a scam to get you to have more productive conversations with Spanish speakers, irrespective of your ultimate goals. Treat the flirting part as a bonus.

Rachel.—El camarero de detrás de la barra lleva media hora haciéndome ojitos.
Rachel: "The waiter behind the bar (carries / has spent) half (an) hour (making me little eyes / eyeing me up)."

Amiga de Rachel.—Pues acércate a hablar con él, chica.
Rachel’s Friend: "Then (approach yourself / go) to talk with him, girl."

Rachel, listen to your friend.

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How to Get out of Spanish Intermediate Purgatory

How to Get out of Spanish Intermediate Purgatory

I recently came across this question on the Learn Spanish reddit page.

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How do you keep improving your Spanish once you have reached a high level?

I have a pretty good grasp on the language, but I feel that I still have some improving to do. For those of you who have a high level of Spanish, what do you do to keep improving and learning?

In other words, how do I get out of Intermediate Purgatory?

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Want to Sound More Spanish?  Drop the Subject Pronouns

Want to Sound More Spanish?  Drop the Subject Pronouns

You’ve probably made a pretty significant time investment throughout your Spanish journey to internalize the verb conjugations: Yo prefiero (“I prefer”),  querías (“you wanted”), él deseó (“he wished”). 

What your Spanish teacher forgot to tell you is that natives rarely start their sentences with subject pronouns.

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Ser and Estar—The No-Nonsense Guide

Ser and Estar—The No-Nonsense Guide

Ser and estar have been fighting an epic existential battle for the past five hundred years.

What started out as an innocent mix-up between three Latin verbs (esse to be, sedere to sit and stare to stand, to stay) has been escalating into the foggy quagmire of meaning that we find ourselves in today.

Before we can navigate this complex landscape we need to find our true north: the difference between the essence of things and their state.

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How to Tell Someone in Spanish That You’re Crazy Excited to See Them

How to Tell Someone in Spanish That You’re Crazy Excited to See Them

OHMYGOD OHMYGOD OHMYGOD!!!

You’re finally going to meet your long-lost Spanish relative/lover/best friend!

How do you share this feeling of raging excitement with them?

You might be tempted to go for:

Llego dentro de nada. ¡No puedo esperar!
I arrive within (no time). I (literally) cannot wait

No te imaginas lo excitado (o excitada) que estoy.
You (can’t) imagine how (aroused) I am!

Unfortunately, that would place you smack in the middle of Literal Translation Land.

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Using “sino más bien” like a Spanish Native

Using “sino más bien” like a Spanish Native

I recently came across a question about the meaning of this sentence:

No estoy alegre, sino más bien triste.
I’m not happy, (I’m actually) somewhat sad.

The question was:

What’s the difference between sino and más bien, and why are they used together?

Good question!

Let’s answer it by taking out the pieces, studying them in isolation and putting them back together again. Starting with sino.

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Stop Confusing Por & Para – Learn Your Way Around the Spanish Supermarket

Stop Confusing Por & Para – Learn Your Way Around the Spanish Supermarket

¡Hola! Por mí unos tacos al pastor, por favor.
Should have said para mí

Meet young Mike McCurley.

He is celebrating his first spring break in Cancun and is currently trying to order some tacos. It looks like Miss Lopez’s 3rd period Spanish class is a distant memory, but that’s okay because today we’re going to learn the secret to choosing correctly between por and para.

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